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Protestant Metaphysics After Karl Barth and Martin Heidegger

Protestant Metaphysics After Karl Barth and Martin Heidegger

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Publisher: SCM Press
ISBN: 9780334043478
Published: 30/04/2010

SCM Veritas engages in critical and original questions of pressing concern to both philosophers and theologians. The major concern of all books in this series is to display a rigorous theological critique of categories not often thought to be theological in character, such as phenomenology or metaphysics. Karl Barth and Martin Heidegger are doubtless two of the most important and influential thinkers of the 20th century.

In this groundbreaking book Timothy Stanley investigates how the question of being developed through their respective accounts of protestant theology. Whereas Heidegger suggested a post-onto-theological pathway, Barth inverted the question of being in a thoroughgoing theological ontology. In the end, both reconfigured the relationship between philosophy and theology in ways that continue to shape contemporary debate.

 

Timothy Stanley

Dr Timothy Stanley is a Post-Doctoral Fellow in Christianity and Contemporary Culture in the Centre for Religion and Political Culture at the University of Manchester.

In light of this impressive reading of a particularly Protestant metaphysic, the book offers itself as an essential text for anyone interested in plotting the development of Protestant theology, but also the particularities of the interplay between philosophy and theology at a general level. All in all, this book could well be the most important work of creative Protestant metaphysics of recent decades, recommending Timothy Stanley as an exciting new prospect in the Anglo-American theological sphere. -- Jon Mackenzie