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Approaching the End

Eschatological Reflection on Church, Politics and Life

Approaching the End

Eschatological Reflection on Church, Politics and Life

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Publisher: SCM Press
ISBN: 9780334052166
Published: 28/02/2014

Stanley Hauerwas explores the significance of eschatological reflection for helping the church negotiate the contemporary world. In Part One, 'Theological Matters', Hauerwas directly addresses his understanding of the eschatological character of the Christian faith. In Part Two, 'Church and Politics', he deals with the political reality of the church in light of the end, addressing such issues as the divided character of the church, the imperative of Christian unity, and the necessary practice of sacrifice. End, for Hauerwas, has a double meaning -- both chronological end and end in the sense of 'aim' or 'goal'. In Part Three, 'Life and Death', Hauerwas moves from theology and the church as a whole to focusing on how individual Christians should live in light of eschatology. What does an eschatological approach to life tell us about how to understand suffering, how to form habits of virtue, and how to die?

Stanley Hauerwas

Stanley Hauerwas is Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of Theological Ethics at Duke University.

'Reading Hauerwas is like walking in on a family argument. You don't always know when and how the fight started, but you can't take your eyes off it, you're galvanized by the energy in the room, you suddenly find the fight is about things you've always been troubled by - and sure as hell will stay rooted to the spot until you see how the argument comes out. Stanley Hauerwas writes unputdownable theology - because he believes in a God who will never put us down until it's clear how our story comes out.'

Samuel Wells , St Martin-in-the-Fields

again the master brings out of his treasure what is new and what is old - I shall return to these essays with gratitude for their grace and insight.'

Fergus Kerr, University of Edinburgh