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Animals, Theology and the Incarnation

Animals, Theology and the Incarnation

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Publisher: SCM Press
ISBN: 9780334055389
Published: 30/05/2017

How does an understanding of the non-human lead us to a greater understanding of the incarnation? Are nonhuman animals morally relevant within Christian theology and ethics? Is there a human ethical responsibility towards nonhuman animals?

In Animals, Theology and the Incarnation, Kris Hiuser argues that if we are called to represent both God to creation, and creation to God, then this has considerable bearing on understanding what it means to be human, as well as informing human action towards nonhuman creatures.

SCM Research presents the latest cutting-edge research across the theological disciplines including practical theology, ethics, ecclesiology and biblical studies. Focusing on innovative and dynamic research from some of our most exciting emerging scholars, SCM Research aims to demonstrate the richness and breadth of academic theology today.

 

Kris Hiuser

Kris Hiuser received his PhD from the University of Chester and has lectured at Redeemer University College, McMaster Divinity College and The Light Project. He has contributed to numerous journals including The Ark, Scottish Journal of Theology and Toronto Journal of Theology.

“Negotiating the place of non-human animals in Christian doctrine is a pressing task for contemporary theologians, with far-reaching implications for urgent moral challenges such as factory farming and mass extinctions as a result of human activity. Hiuser’s careful, searching, and scholarly pursuit of this question, in dialogue with the incarnation theologies of four major figures in the Christian tradition – Anselm, Gregory of Nyssa, Maximus the Confessor, and Karl Barth – is a substantial and welcome contribution to this new theological project.” -- David Clough, Professor of Theological Ethics, University of Chester